Facts About Filamentous Algae and Acid Rain in Ontario Lakes.
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Facts About Filamentous Algae and Acid Rain in Ontario Lakes. by Ontario. Ministry of the Environment.

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Published by s.n in S.l .
Written in English


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Open LibraryOL21812708M

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Over most of southern Ontario, the average pH of the rain is about In the remote northwest, the average pH is above Because acid deposition is higher in southern Ontario than in the northern parts, more acid lakes are found in the south. Survey of Lakes There are over , lakes in Ontario. algae (ăl`jē) [plural of Lat. alga=seaweed], a large and diverse group of primarily aquatic plantlike organisms. These organisms were previously classified as a primitive subkingdom of the plant kingdom, the thallophytes thallophyte, common name for members of the Thallophyta (or Thallobionta), a taxonomic group in some archaic classification systems that comprised algae, . Ontario’s municipal drinking water systems provide drinking water that is amongst the safest in North America. Municipal drinking water is tested for a common blue-green algae toxin called microystin whenever blue-green algae may be a concern. Acid rain occurs when acid-containing precipitation falls onto the earth’s surface. Precipitation comes in the form of rain, snow, sleet, or hail. Precipitation collects acidic particles and gases and becomes acidic. These particles will have a pH level below There are two types of deposition processes: wet and dry.

Lake Ontario Algae Cause & Solution Workshop Proceedings Held on: Rochester, New York Cladophora is a filamentous algae that • Finger Lakes-Lake Ontario Watershed Protection Alliance, $4, Budgeted costs. Figure 1. MODIS satellite image of Cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Erie. Ma (credit: NASA). In the past decade, massive toxic blue-green algae, or harmful algal blooms, have reappeared in lakes Erie, Ontario and Huron (Paerl and Paul ). "In the meanwhile, while we've stopped acid rain and improved the pH of many of these lakes, we cannot claim complete recovery from acidification. Instead, we . Filamentous algae are important because they produce oxygen and food for the animals that live in the pond, but they also can cause problems such as clogs and stagnancy. Filamentous algae do not have roots; rather they get their nutrients directly from the water, meaning that their growth and reproduction are entirely dependent on the amount of.

The filamentous algae will benefit by the situation and grow till the nitrates are finished. Than they will stop growing, come off as yellow brown green slimy balls floating on the water surface. Additional effects are a low CH value, a high pH value and nearly always stagnating growth of oxygen producing plants. Filamentous Algae Filamentous algae are commonly known as pond scum, and moss. It is located in ponds, shorelines, and backwaters, and is a mass of long, stringy, hairlike strands; usually green in color but may become yellow grayish or brown. Individual filaments are a series of cells joined end to end, which give them a thread-like Size: KB. Growth characteristics of Zygogonium-dominated filamentous green algae were studied for 4 yr in an experimentally acidified (pH ) lake at the Experimental Lakes Area of northwestern Ontario. Common names: Pond scum, water net, frog spittle, moss. Location: Ponds, shorelines, and backwaters. Description: Mass of long, stringy, hairlike strands; usually green in color but may become yellow grayish or brown; individual filaments are a series of cells joined end to end, which give them a thread-like appearance. Hints to identify: Forms greenish mats on the water .